Organic & Natural Products

Gianttail Cattail Seeds - 100+ Seed

$6.99

Gianttail Cattail Seeds
Typha latifolia
Giant Tail, Bulrush, Bullrush, Broadleaf Cattail, Cat-o’-Nine-Tails, Punk, Smokers, Soft Flag, Reedmace, Corndog Grass, Raupo, Cossack Asparagus

Description: This tall, stiff plant bears a yellowish, club-like spike of tiny, male flowers extending directly above a brownish cylinder of female flowers.
Flowers: calyx and corolla represented by bristles. Male and female flowers on separate spikes, each to 6" (15 cm) long or longer. Female flowers with 1 stalked pistil; male flowers usually with 3 stamens. Male flowers fade after pollen is shed, leaving bare stalk.
Soil pH: 6 to 8
Soil Type: Sand, clay, no drainage, and seasonal flooding
Leaves: up to 1" (2.5 cm) wide and taller than the stem, sword-like, flat, sheathing the stem.
Height: 3-9' (90-270 cm).
Flower: May-July.
Habitat: Freshwater marshes, culverts, retention ponds, formal ponds, Koi Ponds, and natural and man-made lakes.
Range: Throughout North America, except Arctic.
Discussion: Non-Running variant. I have had this plant in my lake and pond for years and it is very manageable, and will not choke out others in your setting. Use prudence when working with this plant. Too small a container will hamper the overall growth and size of the final plant.
Uses: The perfect accent to your backyard lake, stream bed, or just to help around the property with runoff and other water hazards. The cattail is a tall plant, reaching heights of 6 plus feet in its first year, with bladelike leaves and long cylindrical brown spikes at the tops of its stems; these spikes are the flowers of the plant; the seeds form inside and float on the water, usually to drift elsewhere and start new plants.
Lifecycle: The plants have rhizomes which also spread horizontally to start new plants, and the spread of cattails is a powerful part of the process of water bodies being converted to land. The cattail is found throughout North America, Asia, Africa, and Europe.
Ecology: The plant grows in lakes and marsh like areas, sometimes in dense clumps, or remotely and somewhat sporadic clumps. However, the plant's root systems help prevent erosion, and the plants themselves are often home to Red-winged Blackbirds, Herons, geese and a plethora of other native wetland species.
Discussion: By its creeping rootstocks, this typical marsh perennial forms dense stands in shallow water and provides a favorable habitat for red-winged blackbirds, as well as other marsh birds, and some mammals. The rootstock is mostly starch and edible; it was ground into meal by Native Americans, and the early colonists also used it for food. The young shoots can be eaten like asparagus, the immature flower spikes can be boiled and eaten like corn on the cob, and the sprouts at the tip of the rootstock can be used in salads or boiled and served as greens. This a monocotyledonous flowering plant of the genus Typha in the Typhaceae, cattail family. The most common North American species is Typha latifolia. The cattail is a tall plant with bladelike leaves and long cylindrical brown spikes at the tops of its stems; these spikes are the flowers of the plant; the seeds form inside and float on the water, usually to drift elsewhere and start new plants. The plants have rhizomes which also spread horizontally to start new plants, and the spread of cattails is a powerful part of the process of water bodies being converted to land. The cattail is found throughout North America, Asia, Africa, and Europe.
Edible Uses: Typha has a wide variety of parts that are edible to humans. The rhizomes, underground lateral stems, are a pleasant nutritious and energy-rich food source, generally harvested from late autumn to early spring. These are starchy, but also fibrous, so the starch must be scraped or sucked from the tough fibers. The bases of the leaves can be eaten raw or cooked, in late spring when they are young and tender. As the flower spike is developing in early summer, it can be broken off and eaten like corn on the cob. In mid-summer, once the male flowers are mature, the pollen can be collected and used as a flour supplement or thickener. Typha has also recently been suggested as a source of oil.
Medicinal Uses: The boiled rootstocks have been used as a diuretic for increasing urination, or used mashing, to make a jelly-like paste for sores, boils, wounds, burns, scabs, inflammations, and smallpox pustules.
Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Typhales Family: Typhaceae Genus: Typha
Associated Species: Sedges, hardstem bulrush, common reed, tall wheatgrass, inland saltgrass and alkali cordgrass.

 WE ALWAYS OVER COUNT OUR CATTAIL SEED. DUE TO THE DIFFICULTY IN INDIVIDUAL COUNTING OF SUCH SMALL SEED, WE MAKE SURE TO INCLUDE 2 IF NOT 3 TIMES THE LISTED AMOUNT IN EACH ORDER.


Add to Cart:

  • Model: CATTAIL-GIANT-100
  • Shipping Weight: 0.1lbs
  • 194283 Units in Stock
  • Manufactured by: Various Sources


This product was added to our catalog on Thursday 22 October, 2015.

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